2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec Review

2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec Review
2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec Review

2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec Review – The Genesis is the second Hyundai to get the R-Spec treatment; here its the top-rack trim, controlled by a 5.0-liter rendition of the organization’s Tau V-8. (Conversely, the other R-Spec is a stripped-out Genesis roadster.) Output in the R-Spec four-entryway remains at 429 hp and 376 lb-ft of torque; its steered through an eight-rate transmission that Hyundai grew in-house. The R-Spec additionally offers bigger front brakes, recalibrated guiding, and a sturdier back hostile to move bar. 

Visual refinement from lesser models is given by one of a kind 19-inch wheels, headlamps with obscured chrome embeds, and a R-Spec identification on the decklid. So the R-Spec still appears to be identical as its brethren, which implies it additionally watches out of venture with the all the more streaming lines of Hyundai’s fresher models. A constrained palette of accessible paints (dark, silver, and, uh, darker silver) and inner part hues (simply dark) don’t especially help curbside vicinity, however the auto is great sufficiently looking. 

How Does It Drive? 

Contrasted and our 100,000-mile Genesis V-8 long-termer—it utilized the littler 375-stallion, 4.6-liter Tau, which is still on offer—the 4234-pound R-Spec conveys 115 more pounds. The more up to date model was marginally faster in a straight line: We crushed a 5.1-second 0-to-60 time from the R-Spec and secured the quarter in 13.7 seconds at 103 mph. Our long-termer’s beginning test numbers read 5.3 and 13.8 at 104. The body changes and sticky, discretionary Bridgestone Potenza S-04 Pole Position tires expanded sidelong hold from 0.84 g to 0.87. The elastic did nothing to enhance the 70-to-0-mph braking figure; both the long-termer and this auto posted 164-foot endeavors. 

2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec Review

2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec Review

A more critical change, then again, can be felt in the driver’s seat. While our long-termer slumped into corners and slammed and clopped over development joints, the R-Spec offers highly enhanced body and wheel control and never gets excessively cruel That isn’t intended to suggest that this luxocruiser is currently a genuine games car, then again. The directing is more keen and more responsive, yet it stays counterfeit in feel; the dependability control framework can’t be deactivated and blocks execution at the point of confinement; and the new transmission is moderate to react in either programmed or manual mode. The eight-speed’s hesitance may be pardoned in the event that it implied enhanced efficiency, however we saw only 16 mpg more than 1200 or more miles of blended driving. That is far beneath the 23 mpg attained to by our long-termer and its six-rate auto, and in the basement of the R-Spec’s EPA city/thruway appraisals of 16/25. 

How Does It Stack Up? 

The Genesis enticed upon its 2009 presentation, offering estimable force, execution, and extravagance at a value well beneath those of the created Europeans, most strikingly the Mercedes-Benz E-class and the BMW 5-arrangement. Regardless of its scandalous moniker, however, the R-Spec is not Hyundai’s thoughts on a BMW M, Mercedes AMG, or even a Cadillac V; this Genesis fails to possess the pace, refinement, and street behavior to run with such superior, high-dollar specials. In truth, it is American iron that gives the clearest rivalry most European intenders aren’t getting into a Hyundai regardless of the expense reserve funds. 

2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec Review

Chrysler’s new-for-2011 300C feels some more joined with the street, while that auto’s enormous sibling, the 300 SRT8, is a greater amount of a devotee sled than the Hyundai with its 470-hp, 6.4-liter V-8 and that’s only the tip of the iceberg centered underpinnings. A Lincoln MKS outfitted with the twin-turbo, 355-hp EcoBoost V-6 offers comparable execution and standard all-wheel drive—the Genny won’t get all-wheel drive until its next full overhaul yet has less space inside and effectively best $50K. The MKS likewise trails the Hyundai in driving pleasure, in spite of the fact that it has been invigorated with more standard power and redesigned brakes for 2013. 

What’s the Cost? 

Venturing up to the $47,350 R-Spec brings about a sensible $2000 premium over a Genesis 4.6, and our $48,785 test auto included the late spring tires ($1400) and an iPod link ($35). The Hyundai is one of the biggest and most brawny extravagance vehicles accessible for under 50 thousand, and its sticker undercuts those of the even the six-barrel Audi A6 3.0T, BMW 535i, and Mercedes E350. The R-Spec looks like to a lesser degree a quality, then again, alongside the $38,995 300C (accessible with AWD for an extra $2150) or the beefy SRT8, which begins at $49,025 and can hit 60 mph in 4.4 seconds. Still, with a long gimmicks show, its satisfactory valuing, and abundantly required refinements over past Genesis vehicles, the R-Spec is absolutely conv

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